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RWC 2015: A Ground-Breaking Tournament for Synergy

1. The Greatest Shirt Never Seen Artwork

Rugby World Cup 2015 has been standout for Synergy: the brands we've worked with, the campaigns we've helped create and the ground we've broken through our activation. Anyone would be proud to share the work we've done with our clients, with some of our major RWC highlights including... Canterbury.

Canterbury’s RWC business goals were simple: reinforce the brand’s commitment to rugby, and to deliver its most innovative and commercially successful shirt launch. Bringing to life the campaign message of “Committed to the Rose”, we focussed on inspiring consumers to demonstrate their commitment and be rewarded for this in a truly innovative, immersive and participative campaign, which, critically, drove purchase consideration.

We exploited the ‘pre-sale’ window by releasing an exclusive silhouetted image of the shirt, inviting fans to display commitment by purchasing ‘The Greatest Shirt Never Seen’. As an incentive, all fans who signed up had the chance to physically unveil the shirt on launch day (more on that later…). Using Thunderclap, fans were also asked to ‘Click to Commit’, which meant they automatically released images of the new shirt on their social media platforms an hour before the official media reveal.

The digital launch drove over 3,500 sign-ups with a combined reach of 1.9 million.

On top of this, three lucky fans were then surprised with the ultimate test of their commitment to the rose, when given the chance to quite literally ‘launch’ the shirt via a 12,500-foot parachute jump. Following their safe return to terra firma, the fans were greeted by three England players, with the subsequent video content viewed by more than 600,000 people.
Canterbury kept up the momentum post-launch by releasing the ‘Co-ordinates of Commitment’, revealing the locations across the country of crates (also dropped by air) containing Canterbury shirts. If successful with commitment-based social challenges, fans were rewarded with the codes to unlock the crates and get their hands on the lucre.

The 'Committed to the Rose' campaign ran alongside the Brand Roadshow experience. Demonstrating the role Canterbury plays in all levels of rugby, the experience was based on two very different rugby dressing rooms: one from the humble grassroots game, the other the elite level.

Cant

Putting Canterbury’s brand at the heart of the experience, fans were able to try on the Training product range and take on the “Diving Try” activity, as well as competing against England’s Sam Burgess in an exclusive “Speed Test”. More than 15,000 rugby fans took part in the experiences, all leaving with photos to share socially and a powerful Canterbury story to tell.Emirates

As one of Rugby World Cup 2015’s Worldwide Partners, one of Emirates’ key rights was providing the Flag Bearers at all 48 matches. The recruitment of these Flag Bearers focussed on a social media ‘treasure hunt’ at iconic locations across the 11 Host Cities, led by Ben Foden.

Once selected, Flag Bearers were put through their paces with all-weather training at Twickenham, giving them a taste of what might lie ahead. By the time the tournament kicked off, we’d already generated numerous coverage spikes in the national media…with the winners left with the simple task of leading the teams out in front of the world.

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Synergy also created a genuinely innovative Emirates activation at the official Fanzones, designed to capture the feelings of excitement of Flag Bearers when coming out on to the pitch.

We created a structure housing 38 cameras (a nod to Emirates’ very own 360 degree camera which is used on board all of its Airbus A380 flights) that took a 360-degree, Matrix-style shot of fans’ RWC excitement. By stitching these images together, a short GIF animation was created which they could share socially from the Fanzones in both Richmond and Trafalgar Square.

Emirates Rugby World Cup Chiya Louie

JumpGIF

Over 10,000 people took part, sharing their GIFs and generating 350,000 organic impressions across social media. Of those who participated, 80% said they were more likely to fly with Emirates as a result, making it not just an innovative activation, but an effective one too.

In addition, Emirates wanted to be part of the fan experience at all 13 stadiums and across social media. As part of the wider ‘Bringing Rugby Home’ brand campaign, Emirates engaged rugby fans from all nations with the #BringingRugbyHome promotion. Anyone posing for a photo with the Emirates cabin crew were entered into a draw to win a holiday to Dubai, which delivered over 1,500 entries and more than 1.5 million organic page views.

 

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Coca-Cola

Coca-Cola’s RWC 2015 journey began back in 2013 when Synergy undertook a review of the GB sponsorship landscape. Given the brand’s heritage with the competition – a commercial partner of every Rugby World Cup since 1995 – Coca-Cola were always going to have a crucial role to play at the event. Synergy’s role was paramount in the internal sell-in of the business opportunity, and supporting the subsequent contract negotiations to ensure a rights package that would be appropriate for the intended activation approach.

Once the contract was signed, our work began supporting the operational and brand planning required to leverage Coca-Cola’s Rugby World Cup sponsorship throughout the business. This included managing the day-to-day relationship with Rugby World Cup Ltd and its commercial partner, IMG. Our role mainly focussed on strategic support and operational logistics, including the management of product provision for all participating teams and venues, with over 250,000 litres of product despatched to over 70 different delivery venues. Synergy also ensured Powerade’s field of play presence was world-class, providing teams a staggering 2,600 sipper bottles, 414 bottle carriers, and 90 eskies.

South Africa v Scotland - Group B: Rugby World Cup 2015

The Synergy team also managed Coca-Cola’s Rugby World Cup approvals process, optimising its use of RWC IP and helping to catalyse campaigns such as its biggest ever rugby on-pack promotion (‘Win A Ball’), Glaceau Smartwater’s #6WordSummaries, and social media match ball competitions. We also compiled a comprehensive review of the RWC sponsorship landscape, in the months preceding and during the tournament, giving Coca-Cola an in-depth look at all RWC-focussed brand activity.

During the tournament itself we adopted an on-site support role, which saw the team visit all 13 stadiums and over 60% of matches, ensuring Coca-Cola’s look of success was adhered to and its commercial rights were fully protected.

MasterCard

In a Tournament dominated by advertising spend, in-stadia activity and merchant partnerships, many will quite simply overlook the role and importance of PR. Fortunately, we don’t. Our aim was simple, we wanted to create iconic and engaging content for MasterCard that would not only live editorially, but would shape the brand’s activity throughout the campaign. For us, that started back in April 2014 when we created arguably the most iconic image of the Tournament. Dan Carter kicking a conversion through Tower Bridge initially generated international media traction and set the tone for our later activity, however, so strong was the PR image, that it has now been carried through the line by MasterCard.

MasterCard

 

The ‘making of’ footage was seen on the giant screens at Waterloo station, as well as being shown at every match in the 13 match venues. To ensure we had consistency, we created a full set of images starring our other ambassadors, including Johnson, Chabal, Robshaw, Wood and Lomu, which were used on ‘through the line’ campaigns, including direct marketing, online activation and even in the official RWC shops.

SSE

As sponsors of ITV’s Rugby World Cup broadcast, SSE had the perfect platform to increase brand awareness and reach fans watching games in the comfort of their own homes. It was our challenge to activate the broadcast rights in a way which encouraged fans to sign up for SSE Reward through the creative  ‘Sounds of Victory’ campaign.

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Synergy launched #SoundsofVictory with a world first – developing specially engineered, custom-made sound bottles, which used state-of-the-art technology to capture the atmosphere from key moments in rugby history. A bottle was created for each of the home nations and on removal of the lid, the sounds played out to allow the listener to re-live a famous moment in that nation’s rugby history. The bottles were displayed at a pop-up shop in central London with special guests, Neil Back MBE (England), Ryan Jones (Wales), Stephen Ferris (Ireland) and Hugo Southwell (Scotland).  This innovative stunt created over 80 pieces of coverage across the home nations.

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In true Synergy style, we were keen to react to any opportunities that emerged within the tournament and we didn’t have to wait long. It was made apparent that the All Blacks were kept awake at night by people partying in the streets of Cardiff.  SSE were quick to swoop in and make a delivery of #SoundsofVictory ear plugs to their hotel! Resulting in increased awareness of SSE’s affiliation with the tournament and smiling fans.

SSE Sounds of Victory earplugs

SSE also became the Official Presenting Partner of the film Building Jerusalem, a film that told the story of England’s greatest ever Rugby World Cup triumph in 2003. We used SSE’s affiliation with ‘Building Jerusalem’ as a newshook to promote and drive signups to the SSE Reward programme.  We did this by sharing the story of Building Jerusalem through the eyes of our ambassadors: Matt Dawson and Jason Leonard. Taking inspiration from Gogglebox, we filmed their reactions as they re-lived their experience of the tournament, capturing compelling content which was shared with national and online media. The campaign generated 21 pieces of coverage that included SSE Reward messaging in outlets such as Mail Online, Press Association and Daily Express and the video has achieved 125,965 views to date.

 

The Next Big Evolution In Rugby World Cup Sponsorship

Japanese brands have history with the Rugby World Cup. Attracted by a big Japanese TV deal, in 1987 they accounted for almost all of the handful of sponsors of the first tournament. I suspect we will see something similar when we get to RWC 2019. Except there will be more Japanese sponsors - a lot more.Well before Japan's electrifying performances in the current RWC, Japan 2019 was always going to be a safe sponsorship bet for World Rugby.First, there's the size and strength of the Japanese economy - the world's third largest, much bigger than any of the Tier 1 rugby countries. Next, as I wrote at the time, back in 2013 when Tokyo won the right to stage the 2020 Olympics it had the unintended consequence of making Rugby World Cup sponsorship more strategically attractive, especially to Olympic sponsors and to their rivals. Then there's the way that Corporate Japan has got behind Tokyo 2020. Tokyo was clearly a big factor in Panasonic and Toyota agreeing huge new global sponsorships with the IOC. And Tokyo is on course to achieve the most successful domestic sponsorship sales programme in Olympic history.And all this was before Japan's three breakthrough RWC 2015 wins, which have created unquestionably the marketing factoid of this Rugby World Cup. The total cumulative TV audience in Japan for the whole of RWC 2011 was just under 25 million. Whereas the live TV audience in Japan just for the Japan v Samoa RWC 2015 match was 25 million.Zilch to 25 million. Zilch to 20 per cent of the Japanese population. Zilch to a world record national viewing audience for rugby.I think that's what they call growth.

No surprise then that Brett Gosper, World Rugby's CEO, said last week that for RWC 2019 World Rugby "will make some adjustments to allow more local brands to take part [as sponsors]...ones that sit well with our global partners". Whether this means an increase in some or all of the four current tiers of RWC sponsorship remains to be seen. But I suspect the question is not how many Japanese brands will be sponsors of Japan 2019, but whether there'll be any space left for anyone else.

Ambush and Amateurism: How Rugby World Cup Sponsorship Began

The closer we get to the start of the 2015 Rugby World Cup, which Synergy is working on for four of the tournament’s sponsors and one of ITV’s broadcast sponsors, the more I’ve been reminded of the very different commercial background to the 1991 Rugby World Cup, the first time the RWC was staged in England, and the huge impact the tournament had on rugby and sports marketing in the UK. So, being (I suspect) one of a fairly small group of people to have worked on both RWC 1991 and 2015, here’s my take on the formative years of RWC sponsorship.

Ahead of RWC 2015, the eighth Rugby World Cup, we have a very good idea of what the tournament’s going to be like off the field – consumer behaviour, media coverage, brand activations, and so on. But ahead of the 1991 tournament, the Rugby World Cup was an unknown quantity for UK marketers.

It was by far the biggest sporting event to have been staged in the UK since the 1966 World Cup, so it was our first taste of a world event for merely twenty-five years.

The first Rugby World Cup, held in Australia and New Zealand in 1987, hadn’t really cut through here at all: rugby was a much smaller sport than it is now – pro rugby was still eight years away – and the Antipodean time-zone meant that pre-Sky, pre-satellite media coverage in the UK was after the fact, and light.

There were no meaningful sponsorship benchmarks: only a handful of companies had signed up to sponsor RWC 1987, almost all of them Japanese brands motivated solely by strong TV coverage of the tournament in Japan. One, KDD, paid more than the others and effectively became the tournament’s title sponsor. And as we shall see, in 1991 another Japanese brand repeated the trick.

A 1987 Rugby World Cup Final ticket. Note the KDD branding.

These were also evolutionary times for sports marketing in the UK. Although the industry was growing fast, the supply of opportunities was still limited, rights holders were old-school and commercially under-skilled (not least in rugby), and among brands, sports marketing was very much a minority activity.

The result of all that was that many of the operating principles we take for granted today just didn’t apply ahead of RWC 1991.

And the biggest difference was how RWC 1991 event and broadcast sponsorships were sold.

Today, it’s well-established practice for rights holders to sell their event sponsorships well in advance, and give their major sponsors a contractual first option to buy sponsorship of the event’s TV coverage. World Rugby been exemplary in this respect, and as a result one of the Worldwide Partners, Land Rover, has exercised their contractual option to become a co-sponsor of ITV’s RWC coverage. Similarly, our client SSE was only able to buy the other ITV broadcast sponsor position after the other RWC Worldwide Partners passed on the opportunity and it went to the open market.

All very orderly. But there was nothing like that in place for RWC 1991. Back then, the ITV broadcast sponsorship was open to all from the off, and taken to market at the same time as the event sponsorships. The broadcast sponsorship sold relatively quickly, whereas most of the event sponsorships were eventually sold at the last minute.

Compared to today, it was chaotic.

Two events above all led to this happening.

The first was the organising committee’s mysterious decision to award the tournament’s commercial rights lock, stock and barrel to a (now long-defunct) company called CPMA. This proved to be disastrous in many ways, not least in relation to sponsorship. CPMA priced each RWC event sponsorship at a deluded £2m, got knocked back by the market, and never recovered. Although Heinz (then run by former Irish rugby international Tony O’Reilly) signed up in 1990 for £1million, there were no other takers, and as a result CPMA inevitably became a price-taker reduced to doing last-minute deals: seven of the eight RWC 1991 event sponsors signed up in the six months prior to the tournament (I was on the buying side of two of these deals) for an average of around £300,000 each, including three in the last month.

The second was ITV’s coup in 1989 of winning the exclusive UK TV rights to RWC 1991, with a bid of £3million which the BBC could not, or would not, match: great business for ITV when you consider that the tournament was a big TV hit (over 13 million watched the England-Australia Final on ITV) and that this success paved the way for ITV to retain the rights to the RWC to this day. And even before the 1991 tournament started, ITV knew they were certain to make a profit when Sony bought the RWC broadcast sponsorship for £2million – two-thirds of what ITV paid for the rights.

This also turned out to be very good business for Sony, as David Pearson, Sony’s UK MD at the time, later recalled:

‘Various [Rugby World Cup] opportunities were presented to Sony including [being] one of eight named sponsors of the competition itself. However, what I felt was of much more interest was the opportunity to become the unique sponsor of the [ITV] broadcast rights…I decided to only sponsor the broadcasting and leave the event sponsorship to others…I believed that far more people would watch the matches on TV than in the stadia and I did not like the idea of sharing sponsorship with seven other parties. So it proved. The majority of people believed that Sony had actually been the event sponsor, giving rise to allegations by the official event sponsors that Sony had ambushed the competition. But that was false. We had chosen legitimately from the choices put to us by the agency representing the World Cup organisers and [ITV].’

I couldn’t agree more: Sony did nothing wrong. They took a brave decision on a new tournament and a new advertising format – paying, let’s not forget, far more than any of the event sponsors – and reaped the rewards. Ambush it may have been, but it was an officially-sanctioned and enabled ambush: the responsibility was wholly CPMA’s owing to their mismanagement of the commercial rights.

As to the ‘allegations by the official event sponsors’, my strong impression at the time was that most of this was driven by Heinz, who were particularly aggrieved: not only had they been undercut by CPMA’s fire-sale of the other event sponsorships, but they’d also seen the main benefit of being the first sponsor to sign up – the highest level of brand association with the tournament – blown away by Sony. (It’s perhaps not entirely coincidental that Heinz has eschewed major sponsorship ever since).

So all in all a painful lesson for the RWC, and a wake-up call for sports rights holders and brands everywhere about how sponsorships should be bought and sold around major events.

But I don’t want to leave you with a negative impression of RWC 1991 on or off the field: quite the opposite. The tournament was a huge success and left behind some very significant legacies.

It turbo-charged the UK sports marketing industry, accelerating its skills and giving it its first experience of activating the multi-sponsor major event model which was becoming the worldwide norm. Without that experience, for example, I have no doubt that five years later Euro 1996 would not have have been the huge success that it was off the field for sponsors in the UK.

But above all RWC 1991 was a watershed moment for rugby’s profile, which took off and never looked back. Quite simply, the tournament electrified the country. Everybody was talking about it, everybody was watching it, and especially in the week of the Final, it was everywhere – back pages, front pages and everything in between. It was glorious.

Here’s hoping for more of the same over the next couple of months. Good luck to everyone involved with RWC 2015.

Valuing Rugby World Cup 2015 Sponsorship: A 5-Step Guide to Sponsorship Event Measurement

It's not long now until Rugby World Cup 2015 kicks-off and sponsors start to see a significant return on investment...

…at least that's what they hope.

If you already know whether their event sponsorship endeavors will be likened to a World Cup win or group-stage knockout then you can stop reading now. Otherwise, this 5-step guide to sponsorship event measurement should help you understand how to deliver, measure and evaluate a high-ROI event sponsorship of any scale.

RWC Image 2

So, using Rugby World Cup 2015 as a case study, let’s outline an approach which could help…

RWC Partners Image

By the way, this guide brings to bear much of the thinking already shared in the Synergy Decisions white paper.

Step 1: Understand the Pathways to Value

In the context of event sponsorship and Rugby World Cup 2015, this means understanding that the event could deliver value through different Pathways. Brands like Canterbury and Heineken will have similar rights, but will be using them to deliver different objectives. The rights will drive different levels of value accordingly.

That said, let’s consider some of the Pathways through which Heineken could drive value:

  1. B2C Brand Awareness (e.g.pitch-side branding to reach a global audience via extensive TV coverage)
  2. B2B Hospitality (e.g. hosting and building relationships with trade contacts to increase listings in the on and off trade)
  3. Data Capture (e.g. recording fan contact details through at-event activations)
  4. Experiential (e.g. campaigns to connect with fans at the stadium)
  5. Pouring rights (e.g. increased sales at all 48 matches at the expense of competitors such as Guinness)

Heineken Experience

Step 2: Identify the Value Drivers for Each Pathway

This is crucial. Rugby World Cup 2015 sponsors must know which metrics influence how much value is being created within each specific pathway. Sponsors should ask whether their value drivers are, for example:

1 - Talking to business customers – If so, how many do we need in our hospitality suite at each match? Of the business clients who join, what share do we want to be “high” value? Of those who are “high” value, how many do we need to convert into sales?
2 - Data capture – If so, how many details do we need to collect at each match? How many are attending each match? What is the likelihood that a new contact converts to a sale? What is the value of that sale? How quickly do we need to follow up?
3 - Maximizing at-event sales – If so, how many sales do we need to make? Where can we sell at the ground and how many sales staff can we deploy? At what cost?
4 - Etc. … (In the interest of time I’ll refrain from listing the 30+ different Value Drivers we’ve worked on at Synergy over the last year, but you get the idea!)
The earlier brands map out these questions, the easier it’ll be to:

• find where and how value could be created pre-campaign
• change course and track progress during-campaign
• evaluate performance post-campaign

Step 3: Build a Model

Having successfully navigated Step 2, it’s time to enter Excel and use the value drivers to create a model which helps us understand the value created within each Pathway. Let’s say that Heineken, for example, is trying to understand the Data Capture Pathway. The global beer brand’s model could be structured to make calculations using inputs like:

• # matches at which we have experiential rights
• # attendees (by match)
• % attendees engaged in experiential
• % attendees engaged who share data / contact details
• % post-match contacts converted to sale
• £ lifetime value of average contact converted to sale

Step 4: Find the Best Possible Inputs and Assumptions

With a strong Step 1, Step 2 and Step 3 in support, finding and measuring the metrics that matter should feel less like a scrum and more like a kick from under the posts. Whether it be through consumer surveys, brand trackers, data records on the ground, web analytics, or a combination of all of the above, the key to sponsorship measurement is inputs and assumptions you can adjust but believe in.

Dan Carter

With our Heineken / Data Capture example in mind, imagine that they have one pop-up activation per match. Heineken could then track performance through, for example, conducting consumer surveys at each of the 48 Rugby World Cup 2015 matches.

Step 5: Interrogate the Model

Once the detail is done and dusted, better decisions can be made more easily with the help of a user-friendly dashboard, which could look something like:

Dashboard2

As any Rugby World Cup-winning team will tell you, most of the hard work is done before the main event. Tough questions are asked, different tactics tested and weights lifted before the Final event itself.Likewise, sponsorship event measurement must be grounded in strategic analysis ahead of time, and a commitment made to analyse and gather the necessary data to find scenarios, sensitivities and breakeven points. With a clear sense of how to drive maximum value, CMOs and Sponsorship Managers alike can send staff out onto the marketing field-of-play confident their team will perform.

 

I hope you’ve enjoyed this quick guide on how to take a more structured approach to understanding the value of event sponsorship. If you’d like to talk in more detail feel free to email Synergy at tom.gladstone@synergy-sponsorship.com

A year like no other: Synergy’s 2014

As another year comes to an end, now seems a suitable time to reflect on a whirlwind 12 months for Synergy.

Here we outline some of our most innovative work in 2014, what the wider implications are for the industry, and what other campaigns have caught our eye and set the benchmark for what will undoubtedly be another busy and exciting year:

JANUARY

What we did:

2014 kicked off slightly early for some of the team at Synergy, who were at Twickenham activating IG’s inaugural sponsorship of The Big Game. Through the ‘Big Game, Bright Lights’ campaign, we looked to capitalise on the down-time that half-time offers and re-invigorate the crowd for the second half. By innovatively using Twickenham’s LED inventory, fans experienced an audio-visual spectacular that connected IG’s brand with Harlequins and gave fans the chance to win some amazing prizes.

Industry insight:

Half-time at sports games have often felt like a necessary evil for sports fans in the UK; a short break to allow the players to recover and fans to visit the facilities. The Pepsi Half-time show at the SuperBowl in February emphasised that US sport is still the benchmark for half-time entertainment, but IG’s work at Twickenham showed that, with a clear insight and innovative use of standard sponsorship inventory, the half-time break may no longer simply be used as an excuse to get the drinks in.

FEBRUARY

What we did:

The RBS 6 Nations tends to dominate the sporting agenda in February, and is often when Synergy is at its most active. As part of the RBS 6 Nations activation, Synergy helped to produce a series of films based on defining moments from the tournament. These films truly encapsulated the values of sportsmanship, perseverance and teamwork that the brand and the fans love about The Championship.

Industry insight:

Capturing sport’s inherent ‘truths’ like this, and amplifying them to produce content of interest, based on real insight, is a gift that fans want to receive. Guinness also managed this feat, with their films in honour of Jonny Wilkinson, Shane Williams and Bill McLaren, whilst Barclays’s impressively moving Premier League film captured the essence of the match day experience that makes football so special for fans, and so valued by brands.

MARCH

What we did:

The Capital One Cup Final in March saw the climax of Capital One’s season-long campaign focused on ‘supporting the supporters’. As part of the Final activity, Capital One looked to maximise the audience of the final by offering free Now TV passes to those not lucky enough to have access to Sky Sports. This was a big gesture that delivered true value to football fans, who would otherwise have missed the first final of the 2013/14 season.

Industry insight:

Extending the true excitement of an event beyond those lucky enough to attend is a challenge facing a number of brands and rightsholders. However, alongside Capital One’s work, there have been a number of other examples in 2014 of brands bringing events closer to non-ticket-holders. Two that we particularly enjoyed were The National Theatre’s continued commitment to its National Theatre Live programme, which involves live screenings of theatre shows at local cinemas, and Manchester United’s partnership with Google+ that allowed fans around the world to ‘be’ at Old Trafford by appearing live on the pitch-side perimeter boards.

APRIL

What we did:

In order to kick off MasterCard’s partnership with Rugby World Cup 2015, Synergy created a photo moment on the Thames involving All Blacks legend Dan Carter kicking conversions over Tower Bridge. As emphasised on the Synergy blog, a good photo idea has to be reinforced with insight and good management in order to be successful. Both of these boxes were emphatically ticked here, with the resultant images capturing the imagination of the national media and providing one of the most compelling sports PR shots in recent memory.

Industry insight:

Other striking PR shots that grabbed our attention this year included the Yorkshire Building Society dying 150 sheep yellow in honour of the Tour de France and Puma’s water projection on The Thames to launch the new Arsenal kit. Once again, these examples looked fresh and innovative and therefore excited the media and fans alike.

What we did:

BUPA’s ‘My First Step’ campaign looked to get more people running by emphasising the ease with which people could start, or re-start, training. As part of the planning, BUPA and Synergy found that 60% of UK adults believed that their bodies would not be up to running once they reached 60, a myth BUPA looked to dispel as part of the campaign. 63 year-old non-runner Jennie Bond was recruited as an ambassador, as we followed her training journey that culminated in her completing the BUPA London 10,000 event.

Industry insight:

Consumer insight is clearly crucial for a successful sponsorship campaign, with the best examples based on thorough planning. Whilst the success of the ‘My First Step’ campaign was built on a relevant and robust consumer insight, we make no excuses for including another piece of Synergy work from 2014 that emphasised the importance of understanding a target audience. Ahead of Round 4 of the Capital One Cup, Capital One gave Brian Clough-style green jumpers to Nottingham Forest’s away fans at Tottenham as a tribute to their legendary manager. The story and images received widespread acclaim and, whilst the execution was impressive, the success of the story was thanks to the team’s insight around the 10th anniversary of Clough’s death and his unforgettable status within the game.

JUNE

What we did:

June at Synergy signalled the launch of Coca-Cola’s ParkLives project. Following many months of in-depth planning and research, the aim of getting more people more active more often was brought to life through this bespoke programme in partnership with local councils, which provides free activity classes for local people in local parks in cities across the UK.

Industry insight:

The planning for the ParkLives campaign re-iterated that self-created programmes can often be the best way for brands to achieve their CSR goals, rather than simply buying an off-the-shelf proposition. Another great example of this in 2014 was Western Union’s ‘Pass’ programme around the brand’s UEFA Europa League sponsorship. Each successful pass made during the competition signified a contribution of financial support for quality education of young people around the world.

JULY

What we did:

The SSE team at Synergy were up in Glasgow at the 2014 Commonwealth Games for the culmination of the brand’s GoGlasgow campaign. One of our many roles up in Scotland was managing SSE’s experiential activity on Glasgow Green, which allowed fans to capture a unique photo of themselves supporting their nation. Importantly this activity linked seamlessly into SSE’s wider campaign and fed into a digital leaderboard that acted as a real-time tracker on the conversations around the Games.

Industry insight:

Whilst by no means a new trend, by linking the experiential activity to the wider campaign and creating a strong digital output, the reach of SSE’s footprint went far beyond those lucky people at the Glasgow Green live site, and therefore generated significant engagement levels. Another really simple idea that we loved from this year was Nescafé’s activity in Croatia that again blended the online and offline world simply and effectively to create a fun and shareable experience.

AUGUST

What we did:

A couple of crazy days in late August saw Synergy manage the media launches for both the Guinness Pro 12 and Aviva Premiership 2014/15 rugby seasons, and give journalists, staff and fans unique access to two of the biggest club rugby competitions in Europe. The Guinness launch focused on staff engagement at Diageo’s global HQ in London, which gave employees the chance to quiz the Pro 12 captains; whilst Aviva’s event at Twickenham harnessed the Twitter reach of several of the players by creating the first ever ‘Captains selfie’ which provided fans with a fun, new viewpoint of the launch.

Industry insight:

One of the obvious benefits of sponsorship as a marketing tool is the ability for a brand to give their target audience behind-the-scenes access to something about which they care passionately. Whilst not specifically a launch, The FA’s use of the trophy to promote the sense of adventure around the upcoming third round of The FA Cup is a heart-warming example of a rightsholder giving fans unique access to something special (in this case, young fans being able to take the trophy on a series of their own adventures).

SEPTEMBER

What we did:

2014 has been a massive year for Martini and Synergy, as we have helped take the iconic stripes back to the Formula 1 grid through the title partnership of Williams Martini Racing. In September, at Martini’s home race at Monza, a massive pan-European trade promotion reached its climax, with consumers and trade partners having the chance to experience an exclusive Italian weekend. This included rooftop parties, power boating on Lake Como and, of course, access to the Italian Grand Prix itself, and Synergy were on-hand to ensure this massive operation ran smoothly.

Industry insight:

Global sponsorships don’t get much bigger that a Formula 1 car deal, and Martini have used their sponsorship effectively to create unique promotions that engage with their target audiences. We also loved Coca-Cola’s huge FIFA World Cup on-pack promotion – offering consumers the chance to win one of a million footballs. For a brand that is committed to helping people get more active, this was a bold statement of intent. The additional element of a 10p donation to StreetGames for every purchase showed a brand that is embracing the Social Era and also reiterated that sponsorship, shopper marketing and CSR can work brilliantly together when applied correctly.

OCTOBER

What we did:

October was all about The 2014 Ryder Cup, and the BMW and SLI teams at Synergy used their sponsorships in very different ways to achieve their objectives. BMW focused on generating sales leads and bringing fans closer to the action, with all activity centring on the #DriveYourTeam hashtag, whilst SLI used the tournament to demonstrate their ‘World Class As Standard ‘proposition. Two unique content strategies helped to achieve these objectives, with BMW focusing on using Twitter to create relevant and reactive golf content for fans and SLI creating long-form video content with ambassadors Sam Torrance and Curtis Strange to connect the World Class attributes of The Ryder Cup with Standard Life Investments.

Industry insight:

As we all know, a single sporting platform can be approached in very different ways, and a third brand (this time a non-sponsor) who once again used The Ryder Cup as a prime PR opportunity was Paddy Power, and we loved their approach, using a tongue-in-cheek appearance from Nigel Farage to extol the virtues of Europe coming together.

NOVEMBER

What we did:

The QBE Internationals are always a busy time in Synergy’s calendar and this year we were busy creating fantastic social content for our new client, and England kit manufacturer, Canterbury. Using Canterbury’s innovative new shirt fabric as our literal canvas and creating messaging that linked the product with the team, we were able to put an innovative spin on real-time messaging and put the shirt at the heart of Canterbury’s content.

Industry insight:

As the fan appetite for real-time content continues to grow, the evolving challenge for brands is how to get serious cut-through from their communications. We therefore also liked Virgin Media’s real-time newsroom during the Commonwealth Games, which created fun, amusing and – most importantly – differentiated sponsor content throughout the Games.

DECEMBER

What we did:

December has seen another milestone reached for Synergy, as the first instalment in a series of Royal Salute videos inspired by the world of horsemanship, reached over a million views on YouTube (across four geo-tagged edits for different markets). This visually stunning video beautifully encapsulates the bond between man and horse, and is perfectly in keeping with a luxury brand with a strong heritage in polo.

Industry insight:

We have thought about some of the other content we have enjoyed in 2014 and in no particular order, three of our favourites include:

Beats By Dre – The Game Before The Game

The ultimate ambusher pulled off a masterstroke – brilliantly framing the key moment before a game (the moment when Beats headphones have an obvious and key role for the players) with a little help from among others – Neymar (and his dad), Fabregas, Van Persie, Lebron, Serena and even the two stars of the World Cup final – Schweinsteiger and Gotze. The presence of the pantomime villain Suarez didn’t even detract from it!

Nike Football – The Last Game

We loved how Nike brought out the personalities of their superstars and used animation in a fresh and interesting way, helping them to get around the obvious problems of bringing together a wealth of their talent for a shoot. The medium also opened the door brilliantly to the unique #AskZlatan real-time content series.

Always #LikeAGirl

A very different video – and one that doesn’t rely on any talent costs or high production values – but in an incredibly focused, simple and beautiful way reinforces Always’ commitment to empowering girls globally.

What do all of these videos have in common? All four of them are (in very different ways) tapping into something of genuine interest and relevance – whether a moment or a movement – and therefore people in their millions have actively chosen to watch, talk about and share them.

For Synergy, 2014 has unquestionably been a year to savour in sponsorship – here’s to another great year for the industry in 2015.

Work

Rugby World Cup 2015

BRIEF

Create an innovative, moving space that generates brand awareness in a credible and engaging way whilst delivering the brand campaign Committed to the Game in an immersive rugby experience for the full spectrum of rugby players and fans.

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SOLUTION

Our campaign was driven around creating an engaging and motivating brand experience which at its core completely immerses fans in the sport while bringing to life Canterbury’s brand values of commitment across all levels of the game. Visitors were encouraged to take part in and contribute to the sport they love in a truly interactive way.

The roadshow was specially designed to showcase all levels of rugby with built in locker rooms where consumers could see what it felt like to be in the Twickenham changing room or sit next to Canterbury Ambassador Will Greenwood. The interactive stations gave fans a chance to test their speed against Sam Burgess. A diving try interactive experience gave fans a chance to put on their nation’s shirt and get caught on a bullet time camera for them to share.

Starting in Exeter on 6th August and finishing at the Rugby World Cup 2015 Official Fanzone in Trafalgar Square for the closing stages of the tournament, the roadshow made a total of 14 stops across England, Wales and Ireland where Canterbury managed to reach their targeted demographic at its height of popularity during the Rugby World Cup.

RESULTS

The Canterbury brand roadshow saw over 40,000 fans taking part in the shareable rugby experience.

Over 7,000 fans took part in the Canterbury speed test, while 6,000 fans took part in the diving try experience.

Digital engagement of over 620,000 impressions on Twitter, a series of personalised vines created over 100,000 views.

In total, the roadshow was exposed to over one million people on the ground in locations across the tournament, including official Rugby World Cup 2015 Fanzones in Twickenham, Cardiff and Trafalgar Square.

Canterbury Roadshow

Rugby World Cup 2015

BRIEF

Create newsworthy ideas and surprising content to deliver MasterCard’s ‘Priceless’ positioning and extend the media reach of the MasterCard Rugby World Cup Worldwide Partnership.

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SOLUTION

Working with the raft of World Class ambassadors, we set about creating Priceless moments for fans globally. Rugby superstar Dan Carter took a kick over the biggest rugby posts in England, Tower Bridge, to launch the campaign. Other highlights saw Sébastien Chabal surprising Parisians at the Eiffel Tower, Martin ‘2003’ Johnson’s April Fools film, and a Haka Flashmob in Covent Garden featuring the late, great Jonah Lomu.

RESULTS

Our launch shot of Dan Carter became one of the most iconic images of Rugby World Cup 2015, being used in the ATL campaign, and the video content taking centre stage on the big screens inside stadia – reaching over 2 million fans. Over 500 pieces of media coverage landed in more than 100 countries, across six continents. Jonah Lomu’s haka in Covent Garden itself generated over 5 million organic views and counting.