Bose F1 Garage Experience: The Power of Sound

Can the power of sound take you somewhere you’ve always wanted to go?

Can Virtual Reality, without the visual component, be just as immersive?

Bose is convinced that the answer to both of these questions is “yes”. They know that what you hear has a unique power to stimulate your imagination, which is why their latest campaign is all about getting you closer to the things you love.

Bose, the MERCEDES AMG PETRONAS Formula One Team and Synergy were incredibly excited to work together to bring this message to life in a ground-breaking new experiential activation that launched at the US Grand Prix in Austin last week. Using a pair of Bose QuietComfort 35 Noise-Cancelling Wireless headphones, race fans went into one of the most exclusive places in sport: the MERCEDES AMG PETRONAS garage during the final moments before the cars go out onto the track.

The first step for the project team was to capture the actual sounds of the garage during the British Grand Prix at Silverstone, using scores of ambisonic and spatial microphones. The next challenge was to create a playback engine that delivers the appropriate sound depending on where you are in the garage and which direction you are facing. This gives the user the complete freedom to explore the entire garage – listening in on the conversations between the drivers and engineers, hearing the whirring of the wheel gun and feeling the heart-pounding moment when the car leaves the garage – all in immersive, clear 3D sound.

Spatial sound experiences are nothing new – but until now they have all been ‘static’. As a user, you stay fixed in one position and the sound moves around you, creating a binaural effect. Where this experience pushes new boundaries is by creating a full 3D sonic landscape, giving the user the complete freedom to move around and explore it in any way they want. Because of that, the experience will be different every time and no two experiences will ever be the same.

While the project team made sure that sound remained the focal point of the experience, they brought in cues to the other senses to help amplify its impact. Projections visualised the sounds, helping users locate their source and range, while sub bass modules made sure that you could truly ‘feel’ the sound too.Like any great brand experience, it really brought the product’s capabilities to the fore. Flicking the noise-cancelling switch at the beginning of the experience provided the immersive sensation of being transported to your own private world. But the real revelation was the wirelessness. You really noticed and appreciated the freedom there was to wander around the space untethered – no cumbersome kit, no wires; just lightweight, comfortable QC35 headphones.

Nearly 4,000 fans came to the downtown venue in Austin over the course of the week to feel what it was like to be inside the MERCEDES AMG PETRONAS  garage, and the feedback was absolutely brilliant. Even people who spend their whole lives in an F1 garage were blown away by the authenticity of the experience: if Lewis Hamilton and Nico Rosberg think it’s cool, then who are we to argue.For those of you who didn’t make it to Austin last week, check out the digital version, which gives you a small taste of what you missed. And keep your ears to the ground because the experience might just be coming to a place near you soon…

Brands, Bands, Fans: What Music & Sport Can Learn From Each Other

Sport is way ahead of music when it comes to brand investment. It’s at least ten times bigger worldwide and the gap is growing. From a niche play only 40 years ago, sports marketing has boomed.This hasn’t happened by accident.

Sport set out to make it happen, and has done so brilliantly. With the fall in revenues from traditional sources, in particular record sales, the music industry has never needed brands more than today, not just as replacement income but also for marketing support. So what can music learn from how sport has so successfully attracted brand partners and budgets – and what can sport learn from music?

What Music Can Learn From Sport?

1. Sport has made brands a fundamental part of how it presents itself – broadcasts, events, leagues, teams, stadiums, players. This has done many things, but in particular it has normalised sport’s relationship with brands, in a way that is still evolving in music, and made sports fans more accepting of brands in sports than they are in music – although this is now changing for millennials who accept brands operating in the music space.

2. Sport has used the media to make itself and its brand partners impossible to miss. Globally, sport is ‘always on’ – and always on screen. Music, by contrast, rarely gets a look in and has nowhere near the exposure.

3. Sport has made itself easy to buy. Although, like music, sport is a complex ecosystem of rights, it’s alleviated the problem by commercialising its assets specifically with brands in mind, bundling rights and minimising buying points. Music is still wrestling with the problem of being much more complex, and much more difficult for brands to buy.

4. Sport thinks long term. Most big brand partnerships in sport are built around multi-year agreements – usually over a minimum of three years, although even longer deals are not uncommon – enabling brands to plan long term strategies with all the benefits that brings to both sport and the brand. In contrast, music deals tend to generally be short-term tactical hit and runs which scratch the surface of what is possible and often result in low ROI and poor experiences.

5. Sport can be a powerful ally: when sport and music come together, the results are often amazing. Adidas’s collaboration with Run-DMC. The Super Bowl halftime show. Coke’s 2010 World Cup collaboration with K’naan. And – as our recent #TalkinRevolution music marketing panel event at Spotify demonstrated - the natural synergies which happen when brands bring artists and sports stars together. The potential is huge and the possibilities are endless.

What Sport Can Learn From Music?

1. Although sports marketing budgets dwarf those in music, music offers brands the same mass reach and arguably even greater emotion. This emotion is what drives the relationship between brands, bands and fans, inspiring product demand and marketing pull. Sport gets this, but can take lessons from music’s much greater focus on creating credible brand partnerships and avoiding over-commercialisation, which we also talked about at our #TalkinRevolution event.

2. Music can be a powerful ally for sport, generating both connectivity and emotional engagement. Think of the Three Tenors and Italia 90, and probably most effectively of all, the Three Lions, which became the soundtrack of Euro 96 and still resonates today.

3. Music is brilliant at marketing to the young, as Engine’s Cassandra Report consistently demonstrates. Millennials, for whom music is a bigger passion than sport, embrace brands who provide them with music experiences, especially online. In contrast, the audience for most major sports, which are heavily reliant on TV, is ageing. Music is inherently viral online, fuelling many of the biggest social platforms. By leaning into music, sport can dramatically increase its reach and engagement – especially with the young.

4. Music is still under-exploited by sport. Traditionally the music industry has led talent and content decisions, often with poor results – most recently UEFA agreeing to use Alicia Keys for the Champions League Final. Wrong act, wrong demographic. Sport should get on the front foot and insist on better, insight-driven choices.

5. Sport is terrified of risk. Music embraces it. Yes, risk needs to be minimised, but risk can be good. No risk usually results in less or no interest. Building on this ‘edge’ creates stand out and differentiation. Look no further than Nike and Red Bull, for both of whom risk has been central to their sports strategies for years.

In summary, music clearly has much to learn from sport’s advanced commercial strategies. But conversely sport can learn from the edginess, risk and social glue that music creates. More joint ventures, and better execution, can create huge synergies for brands, bands and fans. Sport and music just need to lean in to each other more. The only limit is the power of our imagination. Let’s make it happen!

This is an enlarged version of a piece originally written by Arnon Woolfson and Tim Crow for Music Week.

TV Ads Are Not A Music Strategy

I found myself talking to a brand marketer today, who proudly told me that he was “doing things in the music business”…After asking some basic questions, I discovered that what he meant by this statement was that he had simply instructed his advertising agency to use some commercial music in a series of forthcoming ads…

Having run through what I’d considered simple questions about the choice of genre, artists, songs, lyrical content, pace of the songs etc. – simply trying to understand the thinking and what plans there were around the campaign in terms of activation and amplification – I realised I was opening up a can of worms.

I continued in my search for answers and asked whether there were any plans to work further with the artists, any plans for live activation, special releases or any social media support in the pipeline etc., I was met by a barrage of apologetic excuses and an explanation that his advertising agency were running the campaign and just focused on the TV ad. A wasted opportunity, for sure.

After asking myself who is the custodian of the brand (client or agency?), I proceeded to probe further in an attempt to understand the process this marketer had experienced in greater detail. To no surprise at all I discovered (and this involved the marketer digging into some emails from his agency) that in fact the music had been chosen by what appears to be a junior creative, who I would imagine had no connection with the audience the campaign was aimed at. My guess is that the choice of music was simply down to personal taste (of the creative) and, in fact, I would argue that what was chosen was probably not the right music nor genre for the demographic being targeted.

I was asked what I would expect to pay for the particular track which was used. The amount of money spent on the music appeared to be above market rate, meaning the ROI is likely to therefore be low (because of all the above) – all bad news, not just for the marketer, but actually for a music industry keen to attract brand investment in the future.

To get to my point, using music should be approached in the same way as any ‘properly’ strategically led campaign. I would always suggest (as a bare minimum) where possible to use insight to help plan before applying any creative thinking around the music. Then consider amplification (i.e. what can be done around the asset beyond just usage in a TV campaign) and be smart with the purchasing of the music, making sure you get ALL of the rights you need at the best possible price (which might not necessarily be what you are told it is going to cost). There are a few independent professionals out there specialising in music procurement.

The contact I met today didn’t only get his choice of music wrong for his audience, but is aiming at an audience who are not major consumers of TV. The budget spent on production and media could have enabled his brand to put on a really impactful live event (concert), which would have been shared by his own consumers, with additional amplification via online channels that his audience interact with daily (whether Snapchat, Facebook Live, YouTube, Spotify etc.).

To conclude: music strategies are not just about syncing music for TV advertising. There is so much more that can be done which is more engaging, has higher impact and enables marketers to track and measure ROI.

On top of this, do not assume an advertising agency can put together a music-based strategy for you. This is often not their forte (of course, there are a few exceptions to the rule).

The above may be basic to some but clearly not to some. There are so many opportunities for brands to innovate in the music space (i.e. beyond making yet another TV ad). Do get in touch if you are a marketer uncertain of how to break the mould. It’s not difficult working with the right team…

Bands, Brands & Fans – It’s all about getting closer…

A few years ago, we witnessed the start of some major changes in the music industry, with traditional revenues from record sales taking a big blow due to an increase in piracy. This coincided with the general public’s perceived value of music diminishing with the record labels continuing to exploit their assets with very short term targets in mind, licensing music for the likes of cover-mounts to the media industry, earning income, spiking sales for newspapers and magazines but further reducing the consumer’s perception around the value of music (which was ultimately being offered to them for free).

Some high profile artists benefited from this at the time, including the likes of Prince who released his ‘Planet Earth’ album exclusively via The Mail on Sunday. This earned Prince substantial revenues. It provided marketing for his 21-night performance at The O2, London and sold a lot of newspapers, so many would argue was a big success. It did, however, contribute towards the longer-term psychological perception amongst the consumer that music has been devalued.

It was at this point that I started to understand the fact that it was the job of both artists and the labels surrounding them to start re-thinking about how to add value back to the album format and demonstrate a reason for the consumer to continue purchasing in the future. It feels natural for artists and their labels to start packaging all of their assets into one deliverable (an app) with the aim of connecting with their fans on a deeper level, owning a bigger part of the relationship with them. The depth of relationship between artists and fans for me has always been the key to success.The rise of Spotify, followed by the multitude of other streaming businesses then created a distraction, tackled piracy and actually incentivised consumer spend, albeit reduced. The real value in music today, however, is primarily in the live business (concerts), but there are various attempts taking place to breathe life back into music beyond just experiential.

It seems the subject matter of how artists and their labels should be pumping value back into their product is heating up. Clearly, deepening the relationship with their fans seems to be becoming more understood amongst artists, with a number of technology players now moving into this space. Until now there has been little focus in the media about this, with most still focused on the battle of the streaming businesses (Spotify, Apple, Google, Deezer, Amazon etc).

If a fan wants to know what Beyoncé wore last night, they check Instagram. If a fan wants to know where Ed Sheeran is performing next, they check Twitter (as long as he’s not decided to take a ‘time out’). If a fan wants to know what Ariana Grande has been up to today, they are likely to watch her Snapchat story. Social Media has brought artists and fans closer together than ever before. It has solidified the artist and fan relationship, offering access never previously seen before. These relationships via social networks offer the ability for artists (and their partners) to promote themselves, sell music, tickets and merchandise. It also provides instant feedback whether it be about newly released music or any other promotional activities. Importantly, it is this relationship, combined with artist-generated content (music, film, games, etc) that can be extremely attractive and powerful.

When Björk launched ‘Biophilia’ a few years ago, she offered her fans an entire suite of content – much more than just music. She successfully continued to build that ever-so-important connection with her fans, giving them much more than they expected, with lots to talk about and engage with.

Since then, a number of artists have attempted to enter this space. A few businesses from the tech world have also moved into the ‘Artist & Fan’ relationship space – their approach being to enhance the overall fan experience, whilst providing insight and learnings about their fans back to the artists and their representatives.

These start-ups include the likes of: Gigrev, Lionshare Media and Disciple Media. BuddyBounce was another great business very much in this space, recently selling to Crowdmix which was due for launch later this year but unfortunately went into administration earlier this month, prior to its official launch. Additionally, Supapass is a new multi-artist platform that has recently come onto the scene, offering not just single artist relationships but the opportunity for fans to engage with a multitude of their favourite artists. An interesting one to watch…

The idea is that fans subscribe to an artist/label channel (costing approx £1 per month). The artists and their rightsholders then earn a substantial % of the revenue share from their fan subscriptions. One generally finds with fan-based marketing that there is always a top-tier core fan who will traditionally spend on artist product and this will specifically appeal to those. By offering multi-artist content, SupaPass are spreading the risk and potentially offering greater impact for the platform. It feels like it makes sense.

It is these artist-to-consumer platforms that will not only ensure continued growth and depth of relationship between artists and their fans, but could also potentially offer a very interesting space for brands to engage. According to the Cassandra Report, Millennials, in particular, expect brands to offer more than just their product or service, and if a brand can be seen to be offering a closer relationship between fans and an artist, the credibility and love for that brand could very easily dramatically improve. Additionally, the learnings and data available could really help not only the artist, but also brands, understand how to interact and behave with these fans, potentially offering a three-way win-win(-win) symbiotic relationship for band, brand and fan.

To conclude, the music industry is continuing to change rapidly. There are no rules and an array of interesting opportunities for brands (as well as artists) to tap into, offering previously impossible access to potentially long-term relationships with fans. The ‘Artist & Fan’ relationship is the ‘Holy Grail’ within the music industry. For a brand to be a critical part of that could be an extremely powerful space to occupy.

Glastonbury Festival: Bands Before Brands?

It’s that time of year again when 135,000 ticket holders stomp their muddy wellies upon Worthy Farm and pray for five days that it won’t rain. Glastonbury Festival, the largest greenfield festival in the world, has been running for 46 years and appears to show no signs of slowing down.

With the world’s best music artists in attendance (depending on your view of Kanye West) a guest-list of celebs which rivals a red carpet event, and a 900-acre site packed with people from all walks of life, there’s an obvious commercial opportunity for brands. Yet, Michael Eavis does a great job of avoiding the inevitable cattle market brand takeover, with the reality being that Glastonbury is very much a ‘rightsholder’ bucking the trend when it comes to brand involvement. So the question is, how does he do it?

FORCE FOR CHANGE

Since day dot (the ’70s), Glastonbury Festival has always attributed itself to being a positive force for change. With the likes of Water Aid, Greenpeace and Oxfam as partners, the underlining message of the festival is to protect the environment, often in alternative ways. This year will be another first for Greenpeace, with a virtual reality dome where you can experience David Attenborough’s spectacular visit to the Great Barrier Reef, to highlight how it’s under threat through climate change.

Although these ‘showpiece’ elements from such ‘not for profits’ definitely resonate with the festival’s values at large, if you look further into the other brands involved with the festival, they may have more in common with each other than you might think.

Having attended Glastonbury for the past three years, it’s only now when I sit and think about it, that a few brands stand out. Upon arrival, if you can still manage to muster a smile having trekked miles with your temporary home on your back, there are people offering you a mapped guide to the festival, in a Yeo Valley canvas bag. That canvas bag becomes a part of your body, and as a result, free marketing for Yeo Valley, as you march from field to field carrying around your tinnies.

This is  a great example of subtle yet practical branding, with no sign of yogurts or dairy products being pushed in ‘Yeo’ face! Notably, Yeo Valley are actually a local brand (being from Somerset), which demonstrates another element of Glastonbury’s ethos – to support local businesses.

CHAMPION THE LOCALS

I asked my fellow festival-goer housemate what brands have stood out to her, if any, when she’s been at Glastonbury. Her immediate reaction was Thatchers Cider, which probably says more about her own festival experience, but a great example nonetheless. Thatchers recently agreed a deal which extends their prominence as the ‘Official Cider of Glastonbury Festival’ for the next five years.

Again, Glastonbury succeeds in associating itself with a local, family-run business, supporting them in becoming accessible to thousands of international festival junkies. Yet, I can’t help but wonder – especially at a festival when food and drink is permitted from outside festival boundaries – whether Thatchers need to offer something more… An experience, perhaps, that says a little more about them to potential customers than just pitching up a series of bars across the grounds.

CREATE AN UNFORGETTABLE EXPERIENCE

One brand defiant in demonstrating their prominence at the festival is mobile network EE, who are truly living up to their name of ‘Everything Everywhere’. EE became Glastonbury’s Official Technology partner in 2014, and have certainly made themselves a brand that’s in demand by adding to the experience of festival goers.

Initially introducing the ‘recharge bar’, they gave revelers, and more so, millennials, the chance to become the envy of their friends by having instant access to social media throughout the festival with WiFi hotspots available across the site.

This, in turn, is of huge benefit to the festival itself, with Glastonbury being the talk of the town (or more so the country) across social media channels, as well as being a great success for EE. In fact, in their first year of sponsorship, they signed up nearly 900,000 users to the network between January and March, well on their way to the target of six million 4G customers by the end of the year.

This year, EE have taken it one step further by creating the ‘EE Festival Essentials Pack’, which has the addition of a waterproof phone case and a poncho, showing that not only do they know how to please potential customers, but also that they understand the British summertime! Although they’re somewhat of an outsider when it comes to fitting with the festival’s core values, they’re making their presence at the festival invaluable. By engaging with the festival audience, and allowing seamless social media sharing for customers they’re offering the advantage of free-marketing for Mr Eavis in the process.

IT’S NOT ALL FLOWER CROWNS & DANCING

Although Glastonbury Festival has appeared to strike a positive balance between brand and consumers, it doesn’t always work out for everyone. In 2008, Reading and Leeds called time on their partnership with Carling, who had a 10-year sponsorship with the rock festival series, after failing to connect suitably with audiences.

Carling took over in 1998, and rebranded the two festivals as the ‘Carling Weekend’ – although perhaps the fact that this didn’t catch on may have been a tell-tale sign of what was to come. The title sponsorship was fairly limited in what it brought to the party – merely making Carling available at festival sites wasn’t quit connecting suitably with consumers.

INFLUENCE FROM THE INSIDE, OUT

This lends itself nicely to the last and final way, I believe, that brands who aren’t directly sponsors of the festival are able to succeed. It’s no secret that celebrities hold the key to giving your brand a boost, and with greater access to social media allowing fast and efficient product promotion, it’s a winning formula. Over recent years, much like its successful counterparts such as Coachella and Burning Man, Glastonbury Festival has become a celebrity hot spot, that plays host to a pool of influencer consumers, delivering brand opportunities in abundance.

The first brand success of its kind came in the form of British supermodel Kate Moss, who famously wore Hunter wellies to Glastonbury Festival in 2005 , which, much to the delight of Hunter, practically rescued the company from imminent administration. It is unreported as to whether this was merely a stroke of luck or genius, but nonetheless the trend has been picked up across the years from celebs attending the festival, with consumers naturally assigning Hunter to the festival itself.

Despite the potential celebrity endorsement takeover within Glastonbury Festival, this type of marketing has huge appeal for millennials due to their unbounded enthusiasm for Instagram trend-spotting and the like. This does its job of ticking the box of ‘creating a better brand experience’ for those in attendance. It is something which brands wishing to associate themselves with Glastonbury should have at the forefront of their minds, for not only the punters, but for the artists attending too.

What we’ve seen is that brands can succeed in adding value to the festival experience – which is, after all, the sign of great sponsorship in action. It’s clear that the sponsors that share Glastonbury’s ‘Love Worthy Farm, Leave No Trace’ ethos resonate well with their audience, creating a positive relationship between the festival, brand and potential customers.

The challenge for Glastonbury Festival for the future is to retain the balance of independence and positive brand involvement without getting stuck in the mud.

Pepsi’s UCL Final Show: Was Alicia Really Key?

The 2016 UEFA Champions League Final, held in the San Siro Stadium in Milan, may have featured many of the household names of world football, but it looked and sounded very different to previous events. Pepsi, as part of its UCL sponsorship activation, presented a live performance by US artist Alicia Keys as part of the pre-match entertainment.

With the eyes of the world focused on Milan for a moment of such sporting – if not cultural – significance, I found myself torn by Pepsi’s decision to activate the entertainment rights. On the one hand, I really wanted to see music and sport coming together on the biggest European stage, helping prove that successfully blending these twin passions was not the preserve of US sports. It would have been brilliant for everyone: the fans, the music industry, the world of sport, and – of course – the brand behind the moment.

On the other hand, I was concerned about the approach that Pepsi had taken in activating its moment: namely by its choice of artist and the material played. At our 2016 #TalkinRevolution event (where we covered the future of music and brand partnerships), we highlighted the fact that successful brand-led music campaigns generally start with the idea first and the artist second. So: was Alicia Keys chosen before or after Pepsi decided on this activation?

To be clear, I have no issue with Alicia Keys; on the contrary, she’s a loved, accomplished and highly talented artist, and the single she was promoting, ‘In Common’, is a beautiful song. She has a significant digital footprint, with 34m Facebook fans (nb. It was 38m at the original time of writing this) and 24m Twitter followers, so from the perspective of a brand ‘media buy’, the thinking is easy to understand. Reach, however, is no longer the key metric. Depth of engagement is far more important, and I don’t believe there is (or was, on the evening) a deep, authentic engagement between Alicia and the UCL’s overwhelming football fan audience. Sure, her Italian heritage may have provided Pepsi an angle for choosing her, but other than that, what was the fit? Having spent time working at Sony Music, I know for a fact that Alicia is naturally more fitting for a female audience, yet both the TV viewers and stadium spectators were largely male…

On top of this is the set-list performed by the artist. In order for music to speedily connect with an audience on an emotional level – in the limited time available at such events – what is ideally required is either a level of pre-existing familiarity with the material, or a simple, catchy hook. At the 2014 FIFA World Cup, I co-wrote and delivered the tournament’s official anthem, which played out as winners Germany were handed the World Cup Trophy. Seeing 78,000 spectators jumping up and down in unison to the track we produced was testament to the emotional engagement that the right beat or lyric – let alone choice of artist – can deliver. What Alicia focused on, however, was a performance of mostly new tracks from her recently launched album. This meant that TV viewers and the stadium audience alike were hearing predominantly new, unfamiliar music, with no in-built engagement properties, which, rather than setting an epic tone for the UCL Final, risked their pre-match set-piece generating indifference or even negativity.

The right choice of artist and the right type of material may well stem from one place: the right contract with management and/or the record label. It’s clear that the thought of audiences from 220 countries tuning into her performance at the Final would have been music to the ears of Alicia’s label, RCA (though perhaps not so much for the fans), but was this a case of the tail wagging the dog?

The UEFA Champions League Final could have been European football's equivalent to the Super Bowl Halftime and Pepsi's investment should have had measurable KPIs and a high ROI. In fact, it should have become a case study for brands to take note of. If this kind of approach is going to work for Pepsi in the future, I would suggest that the sound and feel of both the music and artist values must match the target market and the mood / state of mind of the fans and viewers. Additionally of course the brand values of the artist should mirror – or at least feel appropriate to – those of the sponsor brand. The good news is that even the mighty NFL can get it wrong: Coldplay’s back catalogue at Super Bowl 50 couldn’t compete with the upbeat, floor-filling energy of performances by Bruno (Mars) and Beyoncé.

The future of music (and related brand partnerships) at major European sport events depends on campaigns like this working. Let’s hope brands start to approach music in a more strategic manner soon. There are some incredible opportunities to make music work extremely hard for brands. It simply needs the right thought through approach.

You can hear Alicia Keys new single on Spotify here.

The Music & Brand Revolution: learnings from our Event

A few weeks ago we welcomed brand friends old and new to Spotify HQ, London for a chilled late afternoon chat about the future of music and brand partnerships, featuring a panel of thinkers and innovators from across the industry: Emmy Lovell, VP Digital, Warner Music; Joey Swarbrick, Manager, Rizzle Kicks; Lisa Buchan, Director Music and Culture, Monster Energy; Mark Sutherland, Editor, Music Week; Simon Burke-Kennedy, Manager, Professor Green; and Tom Kitchen, Head of Sales, Spotify.

Our theme was revolution and the potential of music marketing for brands: the revolution in music consumption – more music is being consumed today than ever before – and the huge and largely untapped potential of music to connect brands meaningfully and emotionally with consumers – especially Millennials, for whom music is one of the main passion points.

Here are our top 10 takeaways from the session.

1. Brands have a natural, expected and often essential role in music

Bands and brands is simply how things are today. Modern, mainstream artists are often measured by their fans and followers by who they surround themselves with. This very much includes brands. Simon Burke-Kennedy told us that “Professor Green has had 40-50 brand deals over the last 5-6 years.” Mark Sutherland added: ”Millennials expect brand collaborations to help them discover new music.”

Professor Green and Puma

2. Any brand can create an authentic role within music

And there are plenty of routes to authenticity. Tom Kitchen: “There is a role for brands you wouldn’t assume have a natural connection with music. For example you can find a connection in how people listen to music – context is important.” A long-term commitment can also deliver authenticity: the Mercedes and Professor Green’s partnership wasn’t an obvious match but has worked really well over a period of a few years. Simon Burke-Kennedy: “The Mercedes partnership was founded on aspiration. Mercedes wanted a bit of risk and edge.” But, as Lisa Buchan explained, it’s all about the idea: “The idea should come first, before the asset or artist.”

3. Collaboration is the key to a successful partnership

The word ‘partnership’ often gets misused. A successful relationship should allow both rights owners and rights users to extract equal value out of any deal. It should not be about a one-way financial transaction (which is often the case). Aligning marketing schedules can often lead to more substantial results, specifically when there is a common target market. Tom Kitchen: “Brands and labels both spend massively on marketing but often conflict – working together would be better for everyone, including the fans.” Joey Swarbrick: “The starting point is to merge what brand and artist want to do.”

4. The starting point for brands is to bring marketing in kind rather than rights fees

As record label budgets continue to plummet, artists and their management regularly search for new opportunities to reach new audiences in order to market and distribute their music. The brands have something that artists and labels don’t: reach, budget and often sophisticated marketing. At the same time, brands value the power of content. Agreeing on a strategy benefiting both sides is more likely to result in a win-win.

Mark Sutherland: “Brands have what labels don’t: money to invest in new talent. Labels are taking fewer risks.” Joey Swarbrick: “Brand marketing budgets are a key selling point for brand partnerships with artists. Beats by Dre will be part of Rizzle Kicks’ third album marketing planning.”

5. Too many brands take a short-term, campaign-specific approach

This is one of the reasons why so many marketers and artists are left disappointed. It scratches the surface of what is possible, uses music tactically rather than strategically, and often results in low ROI for both the brand and band. Joey Swarbrick: “The longevity of brand partnerships is important for credibility – not hit and runs. There is often frustration with short-term brand partnerships for short-term campaigns.” Tom Kitchen: “I rarely see a brand using a long-term music strategy. Just lots of brands trying to be cool and short-term.”

6. The sound of the brand is critical

Successful campaigns require planning and a proactive approach. Music is more often than not a last-minute after-thought (often with little or no budget and left to a junior member of staff to deal with). But it shouldn’t be. The ‘sound of the brand’ is critical and brands should be managing theirs in the same way that labels manage those of their artists. Every brand has a visual identity system with colour and design guidelines: they should also have sound guidelines. Why shouldn’t brands use a Pantone reference scheme for their sound? The ‘traditional’ brand approach is simply missing out music and missing out as a result.

In the multimedia society we live in, the sound of your brand is crucial to get right

7. Music is a complex landscape which most agencies lack the expertise to navigate

The various disconnected verticals (stakeholders) in the music business are very contact driven and complex for those with no experience, making it essential for brands to hire experienced specialist advisors with no conflicts of interest, working on behalf of the brand not the rights owners. Emmy Lovell: “Music is really complicated and the complexity can put brands off. We need to make ourselves more accessible.”

8. Brands need to accept the risks, but there is a big upside: risk can be good!

Brands need to move out of their ‘comfort zone’ and be prepared to take some risks in order to stand out and connect credibly, specifically with Millennials. The music industry takes risks – in order to truly embrace music, so must brands. Something brands such as Mercedes has understood. Lisa Buchan: “Risk can be a good thing as long as the brand is aware of what the risks are and might lead to. Whenever you work with creative people there is risk.” Joey Swarbrick: “If there’s no risk, if it’s completely safe, it won’t cut through.”

Mercedes ‘taking risk’ with UK grime artist Kano in a recent campaign

9. Success comes when preparation meets opportunity

As any top athlete will tell you, preparation is the key to winning. Defining what success looks like before entering into a deal is critical. Many brands have historically entered into relationships with the music industry, unable to define KPI’s – just believing that an investment in the property is right for whatever reason (quite often down to personal belief in an asset). By defining the needs and values of a brand and working to a tight measurable brief, both brand and artist are more likely to benefit and succeed. Tom Kitchen: “Success should be about what you actually want to deliver at the end of the day. Something which is generally overlooked.”

10. The revolution is taking place now – timing is everything

The seismic shift taking place within music is happening now. With the ongoing battle for streaming, increased number of live music events and turf wars amongst other content distributors (the likes of Facebook, YouTube and Netflix) and brands such as Apple showing they can credibly be part of creating culture, there is a window of opportunity amongst artists, labels and management where brands can pioneer and establish the future ways in which things are done. Furthermore, the rights owners are listening… Emmy Lovell: ”We are moving at such a rapid speed of change and evolution – Things are now open that once weren’t.”

 

If you are a brand marketer interested in discussing how to be part of this revolution and use music as part of your marketing strategy, get in touch with Arnon Woolfson, Head of Entertainment at Synergy.

Sports Marketing Can Learn From Storytellers

The Wizard of Oz, Harry Potter and Lord of the Rings. These are some of the best-selling books in history and subsequently some of the highest grossing films of all time. So what do they all have in common? And how can sports marketing storytellers learn from them?All three stories have hit a storytelling sweet spot, tapping into an innate human desire to hear stories of heroic quests and adventures. Even if you’re not Harry Potter’s biggest fan, the heroic quest that J.K. Rowling had chosen – for Harry Potter to defeat the evil wizard Lord Voldermort across seven novels – follows one of the most powerful forms a story can take; the battle of good versus evil.

The ability to tell a compelling story is central to PR and marketing, and this is especially true in sports marketing. Storytellers who master the heroic quest concept and successfully use it to tell their brand’s story can engage their audience, change perceptions and improve understanding in a way their contemporaries cannot.

So what exactly is the Heroic Quest and what does it consist of?

The structure of the Heroic Quest, a phrase coined by Nancy Duarte and Patti Sanchez in their 2016 book titled ‘Illuminate’, is split into three chronological acts: The Beginning (Dream, Leap), The Middle (Fight, Climb) and The End (Arrive and Re-Dream).

Simply put, the hero in the quest must embark on a testing and long journey, overcoming set-backs and obstacles that push them to their limits, before they finish triumphant (or in some cases, fall tragically short).

We see these stories all the time in sport; Andre Agassi’s long road to recovery from injury (and a fall in the world rankings to 141) to win the US Open in 1999, Lionel Messi’s rise to become the best player the world has ever seen despite a growth hormone deficiency as a child, and Michael Phelps who has battled back from rehab following alcohol abuse and is set to compete for the USA in the 2016 Rio Olympics. It’s hard to forget Leicester City’s recent climb to the top of the Barclays Premier League and with a Hollywood film depicting the feat reportedly in the pipeline, this may well be the purest form of the heroic quest within sport we have ever seen.

Why does storytelling work so well in PR and marketing? Without getting bogged down too much in the science (take a look at the image below for more detail if dopamine and cortex activity float your boat) our brains are far more engaged with information presented in a storytelling form rather than cold hard facts. Science has proven we humans crave stories. We spend about one third of our lives daydreaming (this actually equates to about half of our waking hours) and another third dreaming of stories in our sleep. But stories do not just come in the form of daydreams distracting us from the day job. Stories can help us connect (the more personal to the viewer the better) with and understand ideas being presented to us. They can conjure a range emotions to help change perceptions of and behaviour towards individuals and brands

People have a tendency to enter the worlds of the stories they are gripped by and the boundaries between what is real and not becomes increasingly blurred. A great story has the ability to transport you to another world completely. Ever wondered why films can be such tear-jerkers or why you grab the edge of your seat during horror movies? Our brains find it difficult to make the distinction between real life and a figment of someone’s imagination.But in a world where your audience is dominated by Millennials – a demographic who are increasingly time-poor and often distracted – how can you ensure that your story successfully stands out from the crowd?

1) Make it personal

The more personal and emotive the story, the easier your audience will find it to connect and identify with the characters involved. Keep your hero individual (rather than a group or team) and your viewer is more likely to relate and feel a part of their journey. A good example of this is Under Armour’s emotive ‘Rule Yourself’ video featuring USA swimmer Michael Phelps:

2) Make it authentic

Authenticity is key. Your story should be born from a genuine place otherwise you run the risk of people switching off and, rather than valuing it, thinking of it as a disturbance. Supermodel Gisele Bündchen in Under Armour’s ‘I Will What I Want’ video that launched in 2014 is an example of authentic storytelling at its best.

3) Make it suitable for the digital age

The traditional art of storytelling is being challenged. Grab your audience’s attention in the first 15 seconds of the story and you’ve got a good chance of keeping it. The powerful Rugby World Cup 2015 advert ‘Force of Black’ by New Zealand’s kit supplier adidas quickly captured their audience’s attention to help them tell the story of the blade jersey and the force of 15 All Blacks coming together as one.

Under Armour’s ‘I Will What I Want’ and ‘Rule Yourself’ campaigns also use a shortened form of the heroic quest to great effect:

While the heroic quests found in The Wizard of Oz, Harry Potter and Lord of the Rings are easy enough to recognise, it takes a skilled storyteller to present the less straightforward events of day-to-day life in engaging ways, particularly as brands look for new ways to start a conversation with their audience as new technology blossoms.

There are so many heroic sporting stories out there for brands to tell. Working out how to tell that story in a way that is relevant to the brand, engaging for their audience and is powerful enough to change their perceptions is the quest that brands must embark on.

Millennials’ no.2 passion point is music… So why are you making an ad?

We spend more of our time listening to music than we do watching TV. So why are marketers still so reliant on TV and so few using music as a marketing platform?

Whilst there’s a lot of negative press about the ‘decline’ and ‘downturn’ of the music industry, with artists and labels witnessing a fall in revenue, behind the headlines it’s anything but bad news. The introduction of streaming and the shift of artists’ focus from record sales to live means that more music is being consumed than ever before.

IFPI (which represents the global recording industry) recently published their annual report outlining a total growth of 3.2% to $15.0 billion for recorded music, partly due to a 45% streaming growth with subscription revenue (excluding revenue from some services’ free tiers) jumping $58.9 million to $2 billion, with subscribers growing 66% to 68 million.

The Album Equivalent Sales (AES) industry metric, which measures the volume of music sales combined with streamed audio continues to rise – from the last numbers released, these are up 3.7% from 117.2m albums in 2014 to 121.6m in 2015 in the UK. And the retail value of the UK recorded music market is up 3.5% to £1.06bn in 2015, from the previous year’s £1.02bn.

Whilst we’re always-on, always-connected, we’ve also never been more into the visceral, immersive, analogue experience of a live show. QED: LiveNation, the largest live entertainment company in the world, just posted a record year in 2015, with revenues up 11% to $7.6 billion.

The Nielsen annual Music 360° report shows that 93% of the American population listens to music, spending more than 25 hours each week ‘jamming out’ to their favourite tunes. In fact, 75% of Americans say they actively choose to listen to music, which is more than they claim to actively choose to watch TV (73%). According to The Cassandra Report (from our Engine Group sister agency, Deep Focus), what U.S. Millennials aged 14-34 share online are: 1) Pictures 57%, 2) Music 43%, 3) Videos 43%, 4) Status updates 38%, 5) Jokes 32%, 6) News articles 28%, 7) Memes 25%, 8) GIFs 21%. Clearly the reason why Facebook recently introduced ‘Music Stories’ its music sharing capability, is to deal with the #2 most shared commodity – Music.

So we spend more of our time listening to music than we do watching TV and share more music than videos. So why are marketers still so addicted to TV ads, when it’s way more likely that their target market is listening to music – especially the world’s two billion Millennials, for whom music is one of the main passion points?

Having personally spent many years talking to senior marketers across many blue-chip brands of the world, one tends to hear similar needs from them all – usually including the need for passion, emotion, connectivity with a demographic and, of course, shareable/viral content. Music is content and comes pre-loaded with all of the above. The lyrics are storytelling and the melody engaging on an emotional level – music can make you laugh and cry…and everything in between.

Music is one of the most shared and recommended commodities online. It’s the most spoken about social conversation, and it fuels the biggest social media sites out there. It simply isn’t being used efficiently and effectively by most brands. Nor is it fully understood. The issue brands have is that active involvement in music is perceived to be both complex and costly – not helped by the traditional historical approach of the music industry, who have seen brands as a cash-cow.

Many brands have had painful experiences and traditionally ROI has been low due to the tactical, one-off approach many brands have adopted. Additionally, with the array of rostered agencies surrounding brands, there has often not been a custodian of the brand in place responsible for controlling the ‘sound of the brand’. The ad agency creating a film for an ad is generally tasked with thinking about what piece of music might bring the film they create to life from a creative standpoint, not always with planning at the heart. Putting it in a brand campaign is only one tiny part of how a brand can use music, yet this is still what many brand marketers consider as ‘being involved in music’. For what really being ‘involved in music’ should look like, brands should take a leaf out of the sports marketers’ playbook – a playbook that at its best eschews tactical one-offs in favour of long-term partnerships with events, teams and athletes.

What is so different in music? Why is there is there so little long-term, platform-based planning going into music and entertainment? Take Red Bull as an example. Dietrich Mateschitz’s love and belief for extreme sports has led the business to truly ‘own’ that space, to the point of becoming a major owner of extreme sports content. Why not take Red Bull’s best practice approach to sports and apply it to music? When will marketers talking about ‘content being king’ start taking music on-board on a more serious basis as part of their content strategy?

Brands that get this right will find themselves embedded at a deeper, emotive and instinctual level with their audiences. Surely music to any marketing director’s ears…

We discussed Millennials and the power of music as part of brands’ marketing strategy at our Synergy Entertainment event, ‘Talkin’ About A Revolution’, which was held at Spotify HQ, London in April. Our panel included Emmy Lovell (VP Digital, Warner Music), Joey Swarbrick (Manager Rizzle Kicks), Lisa Buchan (Director Music & Culture at Monster Energy), Mark Sutherland (Editor of Music Week), Simon Burke-Kennedy (Manager of Professor Green) and Tom Kitchen (Spotify). The event was a huge success and edits from the panel will be posted shortly.

For any further information about Synergy Entertainment and how we help brands navigate and deliver solutions in music, please contact: arnon.woolfson@synergy.global

Synergy Launches Entertainment Division

LONDON – JANUARY 20, 2016: Synergy, the award-winning sports marketing agency, today announced the launch of a new division specialising in creating Entertainment strategies, partnerships and campaigns. The new division will be led by renowned entertainment specialist Arnon Woolfson, who will have a global remit, reporting to Synergy CEO Tim Crow in London.

Woolfson has a 15-year track record in music, marketing and entertainment, focused on creating strategies for brands, artists and labels. Some high profile campaigns Woolfson has worked on include the Official Anthem for FIFA World Cup, Brazil (2014) with Avicii, Wyclef, Santana and Alexandre Pires, The Vaccines ‘Wetsuit’ campaign which became the world’s first ever Instagram video and Mini’s 50th Year celebrations featuring Paul Weller and Calvin Harris

“This is something I’ve wanted to do for years” said Woolfson. “Synergy’s capability, creativity and digitally-led innovation provides the perfect platform for a better Music & Entertainment agency offering for brands and rights owners. And being part of The Engine Group, with its roster of complementary agencies, means that Synergy can provide additional highly relevant services that no other Music & Entertainment agency can deliver.”

“The Entertainment agency ecosystem is ripe for disruption,” said Crow. “There’s a lot of selling and a lot of doing but a real shortage of strategic capability and integrated campaign planning and delivery. Arnon’s industry-leading experience from strategy to delivery makes him the perfect person to fill that gap and perfectly complements our model.”

Synergy works worldwide with clients including BMW, Coca-Cola and MasterCard on global marquee events such as the Olympic Games, the UEFA Champions League and the Ryder Cup. Synergy’s move into Entertainment comes just two months after the agency opened its first office outside the UK, in New York, in November 2015.

Synergy is part of the Engine Group, the global marketing services network which is growing rapidly following its acquisition by Lake Capital in August 2014, with more than 2,000 employees across the U.S., U.K. and Asia.

ENDS

Media Contact:

Reema Babakhan, Synergy

reema.babakhan@synergy-sponsorship.com /+44 (0)7736 836081